Skip to main content

The Braden Bin - 2/26/16

What I am watching:  

  • A few weeks ago, I posted a video from El Dorado High School in El Dorado, AR.  The video is titled "Students react to being called important".  It hit home like a ton of bricks.  I watched it and shared it with my staff smack dab in the middle of a highly emotional week for me.  I was able to share the video during a staff meeting but wasn't really able to say anything afterwords due to man tears.  Luckily, one of our counselors, Ms. Carreno and our 5th grade team leader, Ms. Wisler had my back.  
  • We wondered what it would be like if we did this with elementary aged students.  Would they get it?  Would they understand what we were telling them?  Turns out, they got it.  Turns out, they understood.  Without further ado (if you haven't watched it already), here is Barron's edition of Students react to being called important!  




Website I frequent:  Wonderopolis 

  • This is kind of a hold on from my days in the classroom.  Wonderopolis - somebody poses something they "wonder" about and the people of Wonderopolis do their best to explain it.  
  • I love how they highlight and define important vocabulary words.  I also love how every article they write comes with a video to act as an attention grabber.  On top of all that, there is the option to listen to the article and follow along as it is read for you!  
  • Wonderopolis was used as a station in my classroom.  The students could use the "wonder of the day" or pick any wonder they wondered about!  We would usually follow up the reading of a wonder with a 3-2-1 writing activity:  3 things the student learned from their wonder, 2 things that they found interesting and wanted to learn more about and 1 question they still had about the material.  
  • Anybody else use Wonderopolis?  Would love to know how you use it!  
  • I think this is one of the more important articles I've read this year.  It really does a nice job of resetting expectations and realities of Growth Mindset research and practices.  It's kind of an educational buzzword and far too often educational buzzwords come and go.  Carol Dweck is going to make sure this particular buzzword is here to stay.  
What I'm reading (bonus):   Greg Popovich broke down what he looks for in players, and it was an inspiring life lesson. 

  • I am fascinated in learning what great leaders believe to be the "secret formula" to their success as a leader.  Far too often, unless you have access that most people don't, you never really know what it was that made that person tick.  Thanks Pop for giving us common folk a little insight!  


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

She Doesn't Hold it Against Us

We had an appointment with the doc today to discuss options moving forward regarding Avery's fight against cancer.  Despite her 14th round of chemo, her cancer doesn't seem to be affected much by it.  Perhaps I can update you in a later post about all of that but before I do, I want to talk about love.

Avery has a port and she HATES getting it accessed.  I hate having to hold her legs so she doesn't kick the nurses and I hate the fact that my wife has to hold her arms so she also doesn't hit the nurses while they are attempting to access her.  She screams until she can hardly breathe.  She cries until she can hardly cry.  Sometimes another nurse has to assist us in holding her down because she is doing everything in the power of her little body to stop us from "poking" her.  Anytime I've had to witness this, which isn't as often as my wife has, part of my soul is ripped from my body.  It's really hard being a father whose job it is to protect his…

The Braden Bin - 6/9/16

Quote that's got me thinking:  "When teachers talk to teachers, good things happen."
I'm not sure who to give credit to for this quote but I first heard it from Plano ISD's superintendent Dr. Binggeli during his first "speech" to the administrators in the district.  That was at the beginning of the year, and here I am, in the first week since teachers and students have left for the summer, still pondering it.  I think for too long the teaching profession went like this - This is my classroom, these are my students.  I'll do my thing and you'll do yours.  Good luck and good riddance!  Now, the teaching profession is moving in the direction of collaboration, sharing of resources and ideas, etc.  Educators are realizing that much can be learned from their comrades.  #AmIrightTOTY?  What I'm Reading:High School Suspensions Cost the Country $35 Billion Annually, Report Estimates This is a pretty fascinating study and while the concept is abstract, …

The Braden Bin - 6/24/16

What I'm Reading: Teaching the Teachers

Some things that stuck out to me...

I, in no way, was really prepared to be a teacher my first year.  Thankfully I had a great and supportive group around me at Isle of Hope elementary school in Savannah, GA!  
I loved the part about how good teaching can erase some of the negative effects of poverty on children.  I couldn't agree more with that.  Unfortunately, recruiting and retaining "great" teachers at high poverty schools is very hard.  You have to have a desire to work with our kids and not all people have that.  

That's ok.  
I want to hire people who want to work with our students. Our students deserve that. 

Traditional forms of Professional Development sucks.  Teachers, for the most part, HATE it.  Ok, when I was a teacher, for the most part, I HATED it.  But, then again, I wasn't the best student when I was in school.  I think it's just the way it is delivered.  
I think this guy explains it all better than I e…