Skip to main content

The Braden Bin - 2/26/16

What I am watching:  

  • A few weeks ago, I posted a video from El Dorado High School in El Dorado, AR.  The video is titled "Students react to being called important".  It hit home like a ton of bricks.  I watched it and shared it with my staff smack dab in the middle of a highly emotional week for me.  I was able to share the video during a staff meeting but wasn't really able to say anything afterwords due to man tears.  Luckily, one of our counselors, Ms. Carreno and our 5th grade team leader, Ms. Wisler had my back.  
  • We wondered what it would be like if we did this with elementary aged students.  Would they get it?  Would they understand what we were telling them?  Turns out, they got it.  Turns out, they understood.  Without further ado (if you haven't watched it already), here is Barron's edition of Students react to being called important!  




Website I frequent:  Wonderopolis 

  • This is kind of a hold on from my days in the classroom.  Wonderopolis - somebody poses something they "wonder" about and the people of Wonderopolis do their best to explain it.  
  • I love how they highlight and define important vocabulary words.  I also love how every article they write comes with a video to act as an attention grabber.  On top of all that, there is the option to listen to the article and follow along as it is read for you!  
  • Wonderopolis was used as a station in my classroom.  The students could use the "wonder of the day" or pick any wonder they wondered about!  We would usually follow up the reading of a wonder with a 3-2-1 writing activity:  3 things the student learned from their wonder, 2 things that they found interesting and wanted to learn more about and 1 question they still had about the material.  
  • Anybody else use Wonderopolis?  Would love to know how you use it!  
  • I think this is one of the more important articles I've read this year.  It really does a nice job of resetting expectations and realities of Growth Mindset research and practices.  It's kind of an educational buzzword and far too often educational buzzwords come and go.  Carol Dweck is going to make sure this particular buzzword is here to stay.  
What I'm reading (bonus):   Greg Popovich broke down what he looks for in players, and it was an inspiring life lesson. 

  • I am fascinated in learning what great leaders believe to be the "secret formula" to their success as a leader.  Far too often, unless you have access that most people don't, you never really know what it was that made that person tick.  Thanks Pop for giving us common folk a little insight!  


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Attention Seeker

As an educational leader, there are times throughout the day that I feel like if there were two or three of me, we could actually be getting some things done.  Whether it is responding to emails, attending meetings on and off campus, meeting with teachers or students and doing whatever else comes up throughout the day (I had to remove a dead cockroach from the staff bathroom last Tuesday), it becomes increasingly hard to attend to the task at hand.

Maybe it's just me as I've struggled with attention issues my whole life but I have to think there must be other educators out there who feel the same way.

You are in an ARD meeting, it's 2:00 pm and you know there's a parent phone call you HAVE to make before the bell rings and there's a teacher who needs your support with a student and the last time you checked your email, right before going to the ARD, you noticed Inbox 64, and you just got a call on your radio that there's ANOTHER cockroach in the staff restroo…

Identity First, Then Culture

First, allow me to get this outta the way, real quick like.  

I am, unabashedly, an Indiana University basketball fan to the core of my being.  I grew up in Indiana and in Indiana, if you were raised right, you were raised to be an IU fan.  Unfortunately, the vast majority of my lifetime, they haven't been that great.  I don't remember the national championship in 1987, I was only 4.  

Recently they hired Archie Miller from Dayton University who is known for defense and toughness.  A "grind it out" culture if you will.  He gave an interview  (here) and in the interview, he mentioned something about culture that struck a chord with me this morning.  


“The big thing is to create the first identity opportunity,” Miller said. “Not culture.” I stopped Miller there. Coaches love talking about culture – it might be the most popular buzzword in the profession today. What’s with the avoidance? “I think culture is earned,” he said. “You don’t start talking about culture four weeks …

Punishment - Easier Than Being Held Accountable

I read an article today titled,

Teen coke dealer turns down chance to avoid criminal record
Think about that for a moment.  
The judge offered the young man an opportunity to participate in a Restorative Justice "scheme" in which the boy turned down.  The opportunity to take part in this program, according to the article, would have spared him a sentence and a criminal record.  
You see, when we dole out punishments, it keeps the offender in a passive role.  They are really never held accountable for their wrong - doing.  We think that if we reign down punishment on people they will suffer which means in the future they will be less likely to commit the same offense.  It's simply not true and that school of thought is not backed by evidence.  
Now, while I do not know what this Restorative Justice "scheme" would have looked like, I do know that the young man would have been asked to take a more active role and would have had to likely sit down with some people a…